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Last Friday's Lux Aeterna concert, featuring Joseph Nolan and the Cathedral Consort with Stewart Smith on organ, has netted a superb review in The West Australian.

Mr Neville Cohn had nothing but praise for the Consort:

"A choral compilation well off the beaten track provided fascinating listening at the weekend.

Working in conjunction with Heritage Australia, St George's Cathedral Consort performed US composer Morten Lauridsen's setting of Lux Aeterna against a changing backdrop of colour photographs of Perth featuring unexpected and quirky angles, a facade here, a portal there, the boathouse at Crawley Edge and novel perspectives of some of the city's houses of worship - as well as the garishly lit facade of Council House situated across the road from St George's Cathedral.

But here, it was the music that mattered most.

And what fascinating and often moving material it was, the manifold beauties of the writing inspired to a significant degree by the composer's powerful attraction to words.

I particularly liked his setting of the Agnus Dei; its quiet, supplicatory mood was evoked with very real artistry.

Here, as elsewhere, Stewart Smith's organ accompaniment was a model of discreet musicianship. Throughout the evening, Joseph Nolan, master of the choristers, presided over events to fine effect.

An account of Pizzetti's a cappella setting of Messa di Requiem gave us singing to savour with phrase after meticulously shaped phrase in an unusually lengthy Dies Irae. It came across with impeccable internal tonal balance and splendidly clear diction.

Often the best gifts come in the tiniest packages and this was the case in the two choral miniatures that book-ended the evening. Lux Aeterna, set to the music of Nimrod from Elgar's Enigma Variations, and Samuel Barber's ubiquitous Adagio, heard here in the far less frequently encountered setting of the Agnus Dei, were sung in a way that would surely have moved the most indifferent of listeners.

Another delight in miniature was Victoria's Alma Redemptoris Mater in which the choristers responded to the composer's inspired polyphony in often-hushed terms which, in its quiet way, was so much more moving than many a more bombastic utterance."

       lux aeterna

Last Friday's Lux Aeterna concert, featuring Joseph Nolan and the Cathedral Consort with Stewart Smith on organ, has netted a superb review in The West Australian.

Mr Neville Cohn had nothing but praise for the Consort:

"A choral compilation well off the beaten track provided fascinating listening at the weekend.

Working in conjunction with Heritage Australia, St George's Cathedral Consort performed US composer Morten Lauridsen's setting of Lux Aeterna against a changing backdrop of colour photographs of Perth featuring unexpected and quirky angles, a facade here, a portal there, the boathouse at Crawley Edge and novel perspectives of some of the city's houses of worship - as well as the garishly lit facade of Council House situated across the road from St George's Cathedral.

But here, it was the music that mattered most.

And what fascinating and often moving material it was, the manifold beauties of the writing inspired to a significant degree by the composer's powerful attraction to words.

I particularly liked his setting of the Agnus Dei; its quiet, supplicatory mood was evoked with very real artistry.

Here, as elsewhere, Stewart Smith's organ accompaniment was a model of discreet musicianship. Throughout the evening, Joseph Nolan, master of the choristers, presided over events to fine effect.

An account of Pizzetti's a cappella setting of Messa di Requiem gave us singing to savour with phrase after meticulously shaped phrase in an unusually lengthy Dies Irae. It came across with impeccable internal tonal balance and splendidly clear diction.

Often the best gifts come in the tiniest packages and this was the case in the two choral miniatures that book-ended the evening. Lux Aeterna, set to the music of Nimrod from Elgar's Enigma Variations, and Samuel Barber's ubiquitous Adagio, heard here in the far less frequently encountered setting of the Agnus Dei, were sung in a way that would surely have moved the most indifferent of listeners.

Another delight in miniature was Victoria's Alma Redemptoris Mater in which the choristers responded to the composer's inspired polyphony in often-hushed terms which, in its quiet way, was so much more moving than many a more bombastic utterance."

       lux aeterna