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The remarkable collection of artworks by WA prisoners and ex-prisoners will be on display in the Cathedral from 2-8 July. Works are exhibited anonymously, as prisoners are not permitted the privilege of publicity.

Michael Legge-Wilkinson, whose work is represented in collections worldwide, has acted as a mentor to prison artists and knows first-hand the difficulties they face and the self-esteem and experience they acquire from being able to express themselves through art.

"Many of the prisoners who participate in the prison art programmes and workshops have never painted before, but the raw honesty of their original expression always shines through,” he said.

The exhibition showcases an eclectic mix of original artworks from as far afield as Broome prison, painted in a variety of styles and techniques, including traditional Aboriginal dot paintings.

Artworks will be on display in the Cathedral for a week, and visitors will have the opportunity to purchase some of the pieces, with proceeds going to the artists’ families. A panel of judges will select artworks to go forward to the national competition, which was won last year by a WA prisoner.

The remarkable collection of artworks by WA prisoners and ex-prisoners will be on display in the Cathedral from 2-8 July. Works are exhibited anonymously, as prisoners are not permitted the privilege of publicity.

Michael Legge-Wilkinson, whose work is represented in collections worldwide, has acted as a mentor to prison artists and knows first-hand the difficulties they face and the self-esteem and experience they acquire from being able to express themselves through art.

"Many of the prisoners who participate in the prison art programmes and workshops have never painted before, but the raw honesty of their original expression always shines through,” he said.

The exhibition showcases an eclectic mix of original artworks from as far afield as Broome prison, painted in a variety of styles and techniques, including traditional Aboriginal dot paintings.

Artworks will be on display in the Cathedral for a week, and visitors will have the opportunity to purchase some of the pieces, with proceeds going to the artists’ families. A panel of judges will select artworks to go forward to the national competition, which was won last year by a WA prisoner.